Haiku: Silk Route


sartorial silk

softer than her rosy cheeks

they travelled hard for 

Note: The Silk Road or Silk Route is an ancient network of trade and cultural transmission routes that were central to cultural interaction through regions of the Asian continent connecting the West and East by merchants, pilgrims, monks, soldiers, nomads, and urban dwellers from  China and India to the Mediterranean Sea during various periods of time. Trade on the Silk Road was a significant factor in the development of the civilizations of China, the Indian subcontinent, Persia, Europe, the Horn of Africa and Arabia, opening long-distance, political and economic relations between the civilizations. Silk prioritized the list of the things to be traded along with spices, jewelry, and animals.  (source: Wikipedia)

The picture here was clicked by me in Zuluk, which  was a part of the Silk Route and used by the traders to reach Lhasa (Tibet).One can still have a view of the Young Husband track, the route Sir Francis Edward Younghusband followed in 1903-04 for his invasion and massacre of Tibet.

Shared With: Carpe diem

39 responses to “Haiku: Silk Route

  1. बहुत सुंदर भावनायें और शब्द भी …बेह्तरीन अभिव्यक्ति …!!शुभकामनायें

  2. And the road seems to wind round like silk. Lovely, tactile haiku, but I still wonder if the rosy cheeks are softer..see… you’ve drawn me into your haiku!…however, I shall merely wonder…

  3. Thanks Mani, for your silky narration of ancient trade route and the link to Zuluk. The beautiful north east is still alien territory to me as I have not been to these regions as yet. Your post and the stunning visuals here make for a pressing reminder to visit some of these places before time and health runs out for me…best wishes.

  4. This is so fascinating, Maniparna. The softness and smoothness does remind me of silk, even if the “silk” is meant to just let the traveler know the road takes you towards where silkwhere is harvested, on this route.

  5. The silk route evokes a deep sense of history and shows how differently international trade took place in the ancient times. Loved the haiku and the accompanying picture of the world’s oldest trade route.

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